Whale-protection group offers complimentary specialized one-day training in west Donegal

Meeting to take place at Teac Jack, Glassagh, this Tuesday (July 22) at 8pm

Officials with the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) have offered to host a complimentary one-day whale life-saving course in Falcarragh, Donegal over the next month for those interested in helping any struggling mammals that become stranded on the county’s beaches.

To avail of this offer, please contact directly Simon Berrow, founder of IWDG at coordinator (at) iwdg.ie

In addition, as part of a larger lobbying campaign for changes to the government’s policy on cetacean strandings, a meeting is being organised at Teac Jack in Glassagh, Donegal, under the auspices of Selkie Sailing and Gareth Doherty, environmentalist and wildlife enthusiast. The meeting is due to take place this Tuesday (July 22) at 8pm.

The generous offer of training from the IWDG comes as the well-respected organization denied vehemently that any call was received from the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) for help in dealing with the 12 stranded pilot whales that died at a west Donegal beach last week.

Berrow, who will visit west Donegal this weekend, said, “In contrast, it was someone from our group, Brendan Quinn, who called one of our senior members, Mick O’Connell, who in turn called the wildlife service in Glenveigh and got no response. Mick then called David McNamara, a wildlife service ranger, who went to the scene at Ballyness beach and observed the situation from a nearby hill with hundreds of people gathered around the beached whales. He then waited for them to leave the scene.”

Members of the family of pilot whales stranded off Ballyness beach, Falcarragh, Donegal, last week.

Members of the family of pilot whales stranded off Ballyness beach, Falcarragh, Donegal, last week. Photo courtesy of Selkie Sailing

Voicing his disappointment that Dave Duggan, the acting NPWS regional manager in Donegal, nor Pat Vaughan, a NPWS conservation officer, requested help from the IWDG, Berrow said, “No call was ever received by us asking for our assistance. We would have come up – or at the very least have given advice on the phone. We also have detailed guidance on our website about how to handle a stranded whale situation, which could have been easily accessed and followed. We could have saved some of these whales.”

He also said a statement by Vaughan that nothing could be done for the dying whales but “let nature takes its course” and let the 12 whales die from slow suffocation over five days is ”pure rubbish.”

Another pertinent question to be asked: Where was the state-funded Donegal county veterinary office, run by Charles Kealey, chief veterinary officer, and his staff in all of this? With the local and national media attention the situation received, they would have to have been deaf, dumb and blind not to have heard of the tragedy, and if concerned in any way, should have been at the scene pronto to assist. And definitely, to make sure whales were not buried alive, which expert sources say – without veterinary expertise – could well have happened.

In Berrow’s view, “Everything went pear-shaped because nobody, no group, took ownership of the situation. The wildlife service won’t take responsibility for stranded whales. The IWDG is a small NGO, manned mainly by volunteers but we help where we can. Lack of responsibility at Ballyness, Falcarragh, meant that well-meaning members of the public had to step in. Unfortunately, most of them did not have the proper expertise or training. People like Amanda and Gareth Doherty deserve great credit for what they did, and are still doing, to help protect our marine wildlife.”

Photo by Antonia Leitner

Stranded pilot whale at Ballyness beach, Falcarragh, west Donegal (Photo by Antonia Leitner)

Berrow said the IWDG offers training in both identification of cetaceans (mainly whales, dolphins and porpoises), as well as one-day courses on effective methods for dealing with stranded whales “but no-one in Donegal has asked us to do such training. We could bring the equipment, we even have a life-size, inflatable pilot whale that we use for simulating saving techniques. All we need is for someone to organise a venue and a place to stay overnight for trainers.” He said trained IWDG volunteers “are thin on the ground in Donegal.”

Berrow also said the Donegal wildlife service’s contention that there were no vets with sufficient expertise about whales and that no adequate drugs in the county to euthanize the 12 whales was also misleading. “I’d be shocked if there is not enough Pentabarbitone in Donegal. Anyway, they could have contacted us or the Dublin Zoo which uses the drugs on large animals such as giraffes or even Tony Patterson, the relevant officer across the border in Northern Ireland who I’m sure would have gladly helped.”

In the Republic of Ireland, Pentabarbitone is administered by “a 14 gage needle, the longest one possible, preferably over six inches.” Around 60 to 80 milligrammes are used per kilo of animal. Pilot whales are on average between 1,000 and 1,800 kilo.

Regarding the alternative option for euthanasia, Berrow said, “The wildlife service at Glenveigh Park – due mainly to the deer population – have several persons well-trained in gun and rifle use. Using a .303 calibre rifle with solid bullets fired through the blowhole into the heart chamber, the unfortunate whales could have been put out of their misery within two minutes, instead of them having to suffer for five whole days with blisters on their skin the size of footballs.”

An international petition launched last week calling for more humane treatment of stranded whales in Ireland has already attracted more than 200 signatures (see petition here)

Local people gather with Native American Indian Gary (White Deer) for special prayers and a blessing of family of whales that died at Ballyness beach, Falcarragh, Donegal (photo courtesy of Sarah Sayers).

Local people gather with Native American Indian Gary (White Deer) for special prayers and a blessing of family of whales that died at Ballyness beach, Falcarragh, Donegal (photo courtesy of Sarah Sayers).

Berrow said a small government grant was awarded to the IWDG for 2011-13 to run a stranded whale scheme but only to monitor the mammals and handle data on them. There has been no funding for training courses.  This year the contract went out to tender, then withdrawn in May. “With the increase in sightings of whales and dolphins off Ireland’s coast, it is crucial to have protocols and funding in place now,” he said.

He added that there is no national policy on taking tissue samples or conducting post-mortems on the mammals to find out what caused them to strand. “We have an agreement with the National History Museum and take samples wherever possible and place them there in a freezer,” he said. “But there should be a more concerted, organized effort by the relevant government authority.”

Meanwhile, Donegal Sinn Fein TD Pearse Doherty said, “I have huge concerns regarding the policy enacted by the National Parks and Wildlife Service when the pilot whales were beached in Falcarragh recently.” He added, “It is my belief that locals with knowledge in this area should have been assisted in their further attempts to rescue the whales and I commend them for their heroic efforts. I support the petition calling for this review of this policy and I have submitted a number of Questions to the Minister calling for this review, which are due to be taken tomorrow.”

Doherty has submitted several formal written questions to the Dail, including one viz-a-viz, “if there is an official policy in place within his Department which outlines the procedure for the rescue efforts of beached whales; if this policy is circulated to the various stakeholders such as Local Government and the NPWS and if the Minister will make a statement on the matter?”

Formal protocols and increased government funding are necessary to save the Irish whale population (Photo courtesy of Selkie Sailing)

Formal protocols and increased government funding are necessary to save the Irish whale population (Photo courtesy of Selkie Sailing)

A second question asks, “if it is best practice to allow beached whales to perish without any intervention in order to ease the suffering of the animal; if it is standard practice to prohibit volunteers from making rescue efforts ; if the Minister intends to review this policy in the near future in light of the distress of the whales beached in Falcarragh, Donegal recently and if the Minister will make a statement on the matter?”

A third question deals with lack of equipment, in which he asks for “the reasons why the necessary equipment was not available to the NPWS in Donegal to allow them to humanely put the beached whales in Donegal to death by chemical injection and if the Minister will make a statement on the matter?”

The worldwide organisation, the Whale and Dolphin Conservation group, active in over 25 countries globally, has also waded into the controversy, officials from its headquarters in the UK stating, “It’s a real shame that there is not a strandings network in Ireland as there is in for example the UK. Here there is an incredibly well set-up and coordinated network of volunteers (BDMLR) that are trained in what to do in the event of a stranding and are first responders to any live (and sometimes dead) stranding.”

It continued, “By having these volunteers in place around the country any whales and dolphins that strand have the best possible chance of being refloated and surviving the ordeal. In a nutshell, what needs to happen is a) Interested Irish citizens need to come together and try to recreate what has been achieved in the UK via BDMLR, and b) the Irish Government need to commit to providing funds to set-up a programme similar to the Cetacean Strandings Investigation Programme (CSIP) here in the UK.” (see HERE example of how strong organisation and proper protocols can save some members of the whale population).

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2 thoughts on “Whale-protection group offers complimentary specialized one-day training in west Donegal

  1. I agree with all here except I personally spoke to David Mc Namara at 9.20 that morning and he said he would b with us in an hour he wasn’t.

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    • Kevin, a chara,

      Indeed, there seems to be some confusion as to what exactly happened that fateful morning.

      Questions to be answered:
      1. When the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG), as mentioned in my last post, could not reach anyone at the National Parks and Wildlife Service at Glenveigh and called ranger David McNamara directly whose “patch” Ballyness is, did the ranger go directly to the actual scene or simply watch the people around the dying and dead whales from a height above (presumably the high bank of grass behind the beach)?
      2. If he did indeed simply watch and leave without becoming involved, did he at least call his NPWS superiors to ask what he or they should do? If he didn’t, then his actions are blatantly irresponsible.
      3. If he made the call to his manager (ultimately either Dave Duggan, deputy regional manager or Pat Vaughan, district conservation officer), what answer did he receive? If the response was ‘nothing, let nature take its course,’ that also is blatant irresponsible behaviour, especially for a state-funded organisation whose principal aim is the protection and care of wildlife, whether they be air, land or water. The fact that – as Pat Vaughan told me – the NPWS doesn’t have a boat (ludicrous in itself) – is no excuse.
      4. A fourth question to be asked is: Where was the Donegal county vet, run by Charles Kealey, chief veterinary officer, and his staff in all of this? With the local and national media attention the situation received, they would have to have been deaf, dumb and blind not to have heard of the tragedy, and if concerned in any way, should have been at the scene pronto to assist. And definitely, to make sure whales were not buried alive, which sources say – without veterinary expertise – is quite possible.
      I include below the direct e-mail to these three people. Anyone concerned about what happened at Ballyness beach, Falcarragh, should write to them and air their views strongly. They should hear from as many members of the public as possible so they do not take such a lackadaisical attitude to such a serious – and ultimately tragic – matter in future (my own suspicion is that the NPWS, dealing mainly with land animals and birds, don’t consider marine wildlife part of their remit, thus don’t give them much importance).

      ckealey@donegalcoco.ie
      dave.duggan@ahg.gov.ie
      pat.vaughan@ahg.gov.ie

      NOTE
      Please find below section of story written by journalist colleague, C.J. McGinley, in the ‘Donegal News’ related to Kevin’s experiences at Ballyness beach.

      Kevin Barrett, a local Community Employment Supervisor, said he was ‘angry, disappointed and disgusted’ with the way the authorities handled the situation. He was one of the hundreds of locals who tried in vain to rescue the whales.

      “The National Parks & Wildlife, Council Officials and other so called experts let it be known that they were on the scene and were taking charge, (The only reason the were there was this was now becoming a national and international story)

      “They proceeded to stop all rescue efforts, refused to let people pour water on these Mammals leaving them to die in the sun. Their reasoning for this course of action was “LET NATURE TAKE IT’S COURSE”.

      They said they didn’t want the whales to get any more stressed, How much more stressed can a sea mammal get than being lying on the sand instead of swimming in the sea??

      “Anyway I digress, I returned to the beach at 8.30pm to be greeted by unbelievable scenes, People sitting on these live Mammals to get their photo taken, Dogs barking and snapping at these helpless mammals, I left disgusted and in a rage if one of these so called experts approached me I would not have been responsible for my actions.

      “My point is that these Whales could and should have been saved and would have been saved if the experts stayed away but they didn’t. When they decided the Whales should Die, Why were the not humanely put down by injection or shot. If the person that is responsible for that decision done the same to a Cat, Dog Cow Horse or a Sheep they would be up in court the next day charged with cruelty to animals and rightly so.

      “The way the authority’s handled this situation is a disgrace and it should never be allowed to happen again and those responsible should have to explain their reasons for making the decisions they took and they must remember that with the information available on the internet we will not be fobbed off.

      – See more here: Fury over ‘experts’ handling of stranded whales

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